Friday, July 30, 2010

Flashback Friday: This is where the healing begins

***Originally posted 5/6/10 during my study on Romans 12. Reposted on the last day of Air1's summer pledge drive. I've written about this before and about the costs of maintaining a Christian radio station. I'm reposting this instead because I want to stress that music ministers to each of our hearts differently. Some songs catch our attention (Jay Cookingham went on a recent music kick with Sanctus Real's Lead Me and I'm Forgiven, and Bebo Norman's Nothing Without You for example.) and inspire us, motivate us to change, or just bring us to tears. Not all of us are affected by music this way, but if you are, consider supporting Christian radio be it Air1, K-Love, or whatever.***

Tenth Avenue North has a new song out, This is Where the Healing Begins, that I encourage you to check out their video journal explaining the song here. Meanwhile, look at the lyrics (emphasis added):
So you thought you had to keep this up
All the work that you do
So we think that you're good
And you can't believe it's not enough
All the walls you built up
Are just glass on the outside

So let 'em fall down

There's freedom waiting in the sound
When you let your walls fall to the ground

We're here now

This is where the healing begins, oh
This is where the healing starts
When you come to where you're broken within
The light meets the dark
The light meets the dark

Afraid to let your secrets out
Everything that you hide
Can come crashing through the door now
But too scared to face all your fear
So you hide but you find
That the shame won't disappear

So let it fall down
There's freedom waiting in the sound
When you let your walls fall to the ground
We're here now
We're here now, oh

This is where the healing begins, oh
This is where the healing starts
When you come to where you're broken within
The light meets the dark
The light meets the dark

Sparks will fly as grace collides
With the dark inside of us
So please don't fight
This coming light
Let this blood come cover us
His blood can cover us

This is where the healing begins, oh
This is where the healing starts
When you come to where you're broken within
The light meets the dark
The light meets the dark
(C) Tenth Avenue North

I heard this coming home from work yesterday and the highlighted sections stuck in my head thinking about where we're at going through the R12 book- "Coming to grips with the real you". I just couldn't shake these lyrics. The word "wall" kept resonating in my mind.

I was thinking about walls and I thought of The Wall, by Pink Floyd. I have to admit I was psyched when I heard recently that Roger Waters is going to tour for the anniversary of this album. Maybe that's why The Wall was fresh in my head, I don't know. I was sober the first time I saw the Wall (really!) and like many in my generation, I heard the album before I ever saw the movie. So I had a preconceived notion of an Orwellian/Phillip Dick sci-fi-ish movie and I was surprised by what I saw. No, not by the nearly pornographic animation, but by the darkness of underlying story. I admit that I instantly related. Roger Waters is soliciting videos and names of friends or family who have died in the wars going on overseas to include in his stage show. He freely admits the strong anti-war sentiment that runs through the storyline. However, this part of the plot only deflects from the real story- the Walls "Pink" built around himself. The irony is that Waters embraces the anti-war message, which is one of the bricks in Pink's wall. Relating back to R12, Pink denies part of himself by using the War, and the loss of his father, as an excuse for is antisocial anarchist behavior. (He also blames his mom for his relationships with women, but that's a whole other story) Even though he sings the song, and the animation shows the wall coming down, he is never really free. He never comes to grips with the real him.

I had quite a few Facebook comments on Tuesday's post. An old friend that I grew up with reminded me that there are a lot of things out of our control (our gender, our parents) that shape who we are. I agree, except that our character is defined by how we respond to those things. We can either blame shift (my dad was an alcoholic, my parents divorced when I was young...) or we can do something about it. Yes, those things affect who we are, but God frees us from all of that.

So how do we do it? How do we come to grips with the real us? Yes, Romans 12:3-8 is a good start and a great scriptural foundation to build on. But the truth is, we'll never break down the walls we built around us until we open up about who we are; share our deepest and darkest secrets; and stop blaming what we cannot control for who we are. And that is where the healing begins.

2 comments:

Michael Perkins said...

This was one of those songs that I had to pull the truck over the first time I heard it. Not trying to sound cliche, but it wrecked me.

Fatha Frank said...

Air1 kept teasing the song before it was released so I finally went online and found the video clip linked. I was floored. So much truth in that song, it wrecked me too. Thanks for sharing.